All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘joy’

WHY SO SERIOUS?

Back in the days when I was a practicing lawyer in Washington DC, I used to straighten my very curly hair. Every day. I used to get up early, forsake sleep or a work-out, and stand there and sweat it out. Pulling. Tugging my hair. Struggling. Resisting my natural curls.

Why?

I thought that in order to be seen as a competent lawyer, I had to be serious. I assumed curly hair meant I wasn’t serious. Straight hair equaled serious and competent.

One day I woke up and changed careers. What followed was a return to my natural curls. No more waking up early to straighten the curls. My morning options opened up: I could sleep, meditate longer, work out more often.

Does that mean I am not as competent or serious anymore? Not necessarily. I’m definitely competent and you better believe I’m serious about my work as a brand strategist.

I just stopped taking myself so seriously and decided to lighten up. That meant accepting who I was naturally- curly hair and all.   I stopped resisting my natural tendencies and started to “own” them.

You know what happened next? My curly hair became a part of my brand. Used wisely, I was able to balance curls as a complement to my branding strengths and talents. That meant in part that if my hair is curly, I made sure I offset the fun and free nature of the curls with a more smart visual brand (ie, no low cut tops, etc).

My curly hair is now part of my values and signals my creative and fun nature and expertise. No more resistance.

Yet, I regularly hear from so many of my clients that they want to seen as competent so they are working on being more “serious”. What does serious have to do with competence?

Being serious does not sell your brand.

Emotional resonance in brand development is what sells your brand. Emotional resonance is crucial. The only emotion that sells is happiness. So if you are telling me that your serious brand signals happiness somehow, then go for it.

Unfortunately, none of us really intend for our serious brand to be giving off a vibe of happiness. So our brand fails AND you are unhappy and confused, too.

Consider that our need for others to see us as competent is really our desire to be respected by others. It has nothing to do with being serious. Gaining others’ respect means we respect ourselves first. But do we respect ourselves enough first and foremost to own our own strengths (and curly hair)? No one can respect us otherwise- whether we are serious or not.

So what does this mean for you and your business, career, and your business brand, too? Stop and ask yourself:

  • Where in your life and career do you think you need to be more competent? Why?
  • Do you respect yourself to consider yourself competent?
  • How are you trying to achieve this competence by being more serious?
  • Where in your life and career could you show up more happy and sell more happy?
  • What would your own brand and your business/career brand look like if you were more happy and less serious?

Silent Brand Leadership : Leading Less & Staying Indispensible Part I

puris_photo_2014Aside from being a wife and family member, I am blessed to have several leadership roles, including running a branding company. So often I’m trying to figure out how to lead well.   If I trust my gut and stay self-aware, it’s easy. If I start to analyze and agonize, it quickly becomes very hard to lead- much less to stay present.

What’s the right thing to do in any leadership opportunity situation? Should I say something? Should I stay quiet and let those I lead figure it out? Should I say just a little bit but not give away the farm? What if they don’t like me anymore once I open my mouth to lead? Worse, what if they hate me?

And on and on and on….it can get maddening if I let it.

Here’s what I’ve learned through my trials and tribulations in developing a leadership brand that works for me.

First, I’ve discovered I have to have a general goal. My goal (and I recommend it for you) is to aim to have my leadership style resonate my brand. This really means making sure that your only goal is to develop a brand culture for whatever group you are leading.

This brand culture must come from values development. How? It involves the human element- does everyone you lead have their values identified? Are they allowed and proud to own their values? Do their values seep into the organization’s brand culture?

For instance, my number one value is integrity. My number two value is to have fun and be happy.

Once I’ve set my leadership branding goal, I now have a pattern to compare all my actions as a leader. This ensures my brand values (and company brand culture) syncs up with, and consistently resonate, all my leadership actions.

In the next blog, I’ll talk about what to do from this point to ensure a strong leadership brand for you and your organization/employees.

For now ask yourself:

  • What are my brand values?
  • Does my leadership convey my brand values?
  • Do those you lead (your employees and/or colleagues) know their brand values and “own” them well?

 

 

2016: How Are You Remembered?

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922757_60722554Before you think I’m asking you to make a new year’s resolution that you won’t keep, think again and choose to see things differently.  Yes, a new year is here.  With it can come the drudgery of the past or an opportunity for you to develop a brand for yourself that will leave you happier and more successful. Each of us has a choice.

I personally don’t get the concept of a new year’s resolution.  I believe I need to always be resolved to be better and think differently.  Otherwise, my brand stagnates and, in a way,  so does everything I touch.  Besides, resolutions sound kind of scary to me.  It feels like there’s no turning back — if I don’t keep my resolution or do it “good enough”, then I fail.

Deliberate brand creation is a marathon, not a new year’s sprint.  That’s what I always tell all our clients and also why 99% of our clients are in some sort of maintenance program with me once we have developed their initial brand. The process is never “over”, your brand is never “done”.  The good news is your brand just evolves and grows with time as you grow and change.  That’s exciting! That takes time, effort, deliberate thought and deliberate action and of course, a plan.

So let’s look at it differently and have you develop your brand from a new perspective.  Close your eyes and picture yourself on December 31, 2016.  An entire year has come and gone.

How is it that you are remembered  by the world on 12/31/16?  As Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “To know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived, this is to have succeeded”.  Barbara Stanny said in her fantastic book, Sacred Success, “All that matters is that your legacy reflects your purpose, makes you proud, brings you pleasure, and inspires or improves something or someone else”.

The memories others have of us are our brands.  Think in terms of memories. It’s then easier to relate to branding as a concept.

To get started, ask yourself:

  • What’s been my contribution in 2016? In answering this look at:
    • Did I have a particular cause and/or purpose greater than myself for which I stood?
    • How do people remember me emotionally?  As Carnegie once said,  we are all creatures of emotion, and not logic.  Emotions go farther than any of us want to believe. Positive emotions leave us with positive memories.
    • Did my contribution leave joy in the hearts of others ? Notice I did not mention leaving joy in the mind’s of others. The emotion of joy is captured in our hearts.
    • Did I choose to see people’s differences only, or was I compassionate towards others and towards MYSELF choosing to see our similarities?
  • How can my contribution continue to grow (and my brand develop) in the upcoming year?

Here’s to a 2016 filled with all the wonderful memories that leave you as the brand you want to be remembered by.

Branding Case Study: Pirch

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pirch1“Kitchen. Bath. Outdoor. Joy.” This is the Pirch company tagline, so it seems.  However, when you dig deeper into Pirch, the luxury appliance retailer, you find out their tagline is their manifesto and way of life.

Why should you care?  I spend most of my days preaching the countless reasons why every brand (personal and business) should reflect and be based on the concept of joy and happiness.  I realize it is harder for left-brained professionals to really “get” and “own” the joy factor.  After all, aren’t our clients/consumers buying our brilliance or our nifty products?  The short answer is always an emphatic, “no”!

If you don’t believe me, check out Pirch.  What does joy have to do with appliances?!  Everything.

When I first walked into their new San Diego retail store years ago, I was floored.  I couldn’t believe that they had “live joyfully” above the entrance to the store. I couldn’t believe they had a complimentary beverage bar. I couldn’t believe they had “live joyfully” bracelets and car stickers for us all.  I couldn’t believe how much fun it was to be in their store. To a branding expert, it was my biggest hopes and dreams for clients come true.

So I started to walk around the store in a trance.  I couldn’t believe how fantastic their products were and how to true to form each employee was to the Pirch manifesto.  No wonder the Pirch brand has been compared to Apple and Lululemon. No wonder Forbes has written glowing words about them.

As I always talk about to clients, what is your “why”? Not just a generic, “Katy-made-me-do-it-why”, but a sincere reason for getting up every morning and making a difference.  I know I never owned my “why” all those years I practiced law. I was lost and confused and unsure of my role in the world.  I was frustrated. It wasn’t until 9 years ago when I found my “why” as a branding expert, that I found my joy in and purpose. Now it all works well.

Pirch has their “why” beautifully figured out.  If you don’t believe me, hop on their website and check out the “Why” tab complete with videos of the team in action (yes, I got a tear in my eye watching) showing you their “why”.

They’re even mastering the social media brand side so well.  Case in point: I just discovered their FB page. I hopped on and noticed that they were giving away free concert tickets to the first four people who told them why they wanted to go to the concert.  They call it, “Random Acts of Kindness”.

So what does this mean for you? So much, my friend. Stop and consider:

– What is your “why”?

– Where do you get hung up on the product and service details of your work and miss the bigger picture of the emotional reason clients buy from us?

– How can you build more self-awareness (and joy) into your personal and business brand?

Stop by a Pirch location and see for yourself.  Oh, and ‘thank you’ Pirch for my concert tickets!

Top 3 Ways To Build Your Brand As A Musician

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denverphotoI was recently watching the 2013 BBC John Denver special on PBS.  I hadn’t thought of John Denver for years!  I’m not that old, but I do remember listening to his songs when I was around 10 years old.  His music always seemed so effortless, kind, gentle and meaningful.  His fan base was huge.

According to his website, Denver was one of the most successful entertainers of the 1970s with sales over 33 million to date, including eight Billboard Top 10 RCA Albums in the U.S. (three of which hit #1). On the BBC special, as they interviewed various people connected to Denver, I started to really see why Denver had been such a lovable musician with such a distinct brand.   According to one interviewee who played guitar in his band Denver, “put people in the palm of his hands”.  Wouldn’t you love to do that as a musician?

It also became very clear why Denver had critics that were so nasty.  While it seems like the norm these days, sadly, these critics really aimed to take him down for being happy, communicating his talent through song and wanting to share it with others.  Apparently, Rolling Stones Magazine defined him rather ludicrously in 1976 as, “…devoid of all human characteristics.”

I chuckled when I heard that last quote. It was a sad commentary on parts of society believing that happiness is not a valuable human characteristic.  As I always teach, 75% of everything you and I buy is based on how we feel about it, not the content and happiness is the only emotion that sells. So you better have a happy brand!

But I get it.  Sometimes it is easier to poke fun (or just be downright mean) to those who are happy and successful because it is hard to conceive that it could be so easy.  Jealousy does that to us.  I know that every once in while I can feel the critics eyes on me when I preach happiness as a brand necessity.  It never feels comfortable when I get weird glances like I must be nuts.  However, I know my truth and try to hold steady- like John Denver did.

So what does this mean for you as an artist?  Build your musical brand as:

1. Genuine– Be yourself and make sure you stay true to who you are. Otherwise, your real audience will sense the dissonance and shrink.  You will then be stuck with a fickle audience that is not loyal. 

2. Fun & Happy– I’m not asking you to sing the Blues and be jumping up and down with joy.  That’s dissonance, too.  Happiness can show up in so many ways.  Always remember the only emotion that sells anything- including music- is happiness. Are you happy? If not, get happier and make sure I feel that from your brand.

3. Self-Expression– don’t ever let anyone tell you that you must alter your brand and music to fit a niche that is not you. It won’t work, plain and simple. It may sell records and make others wealthy in the short term, but it will not work for you long term as an artist.  Trust me, but if in doubt see #1 above.

Email me with any questions you have.  

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First, Know Yourself So You Know What To Market.