All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘Happiness’

What’s Success?

When I was a practicing securities lawyer, I had a very particular notion of what it meant for me to be a success.  Being successful for me meant to either be a high-salaried employee, meet and exceed my billables each month and/or get promoted or find a new and better job within my industry.  That’s it, I’m sorry to say.

As I always say, branding is a marathon with many iterations.  We are never broken or “need” anything.  We choose to see things differently and then grow and change.  Dynamic brands that are open to change succeed.

Looking back on my previous career and life, I feel sorry for that iteration of me. I truly was “Version 1.0” of my brand.  I wasn’t really open to change because I didn’t know what I didn’t know.

Until one day I wasn’t happy anymore as a securities lawyer.

That was the day I opened my eyes and was ready for change and growth.  That was the day I decided to be truly successful.  Was it easy? No.  Change is never easy.  Was it worth the ride? Heck yes!

Success Defined

As I look at the definition of “success” as a brand and as a person, I’m reminded of something I heard at Sunday service once at the Unity Center here in San Diego.  “Success” is defined as a) continued happiness and b) reaching for worthy goals.  In looking at  what are your worthy goals, we were told to look for i) what are your longings in life? and  ii) where do you come alive in your life?  This really struck me as a healthy view of success.

Looking at it from a client-facing perspective, if you believe my premise that a great client experience is based on each and every employee having a great brand (having their values in hand, having empathy, knowing who they are), then a successful and happy employee MUST lead to a great client experience and higher revenues for any organization.

Resistance

In life and at work, we put up such resistance.  We fight the norm, we fight the establishment, we fight our boss, we fight our colleagues and we end up fighting ourselves.  The result? Unhappiness.

All of this leads to so much friction and negative effort.  We exhaust ourselves and leave others looking away from us. Our brand is spoiled.

At that Sunday service, I was reminded that the word, “Affluence” comes from the derivative, “to flow with”.   So what if you let it all flow naturally?  I guarantee you that you would be happier and more successful.

What does this mean for you?

Stop and consider:

  • Are you happy? If you hate my question, there’s something really great for you in this query.  Stay strong and be brave enough to look at it.
  • Are you reaching for worthy goals?  Stop and question your goals.  Looking back, my billables were NOT my worthy goals in life.
  • What are you longing for in your life?
  • Where in your life experiences do you find you really come alive? Why?
  • How are you nurturing happiness within your employee pools’ brands?
  • Where can you give up resistance in your life and go with the flow towards affluence?

If this article resonated with you, please pass it on.  I’d love your feedback.

Why So Sad? Sadness As A Brand.

I remember graduating from law school and taking the Indiana bar exam. While I was waiting for my bar results, I couldn’t imagine what I would do if I didn’t pass the exam.

What else could I do? I had gone to law school so I could practice law and “be” a lawyer. Just the thought of not being able to “be” a lawyer freaked me out and it made me sad. A general sense of depression came over me as I waited for the test results.

These days within the practice of law, or when we discuss any professional exceling at work and working “hard”, we naturally (and unfortunately) tend to discuss the high incidence of depression in the workforce.

This depression can come about for other reasons, too. I was recently discussing this very topic with a lawyer whose spouse is in the military. Every so many years they must move as her husband gets new orders. Each move guarantees a high likelihood that she, as a lawyer, won’t be able to practice in that new state because she hasn’t taken that particular state’s bar exam yet. She noted how this situation causes so many lawyers in her position to go into a deep depression. I had never stopped to consider this fact. Yet, I totally see how that situation can cause depression.

Why does this sadness and/or depression happen to professionals regarding their careers?

I think this happens because we are too tied to our identity as a particular professional and career. We don’t identify ourselves as people first, rather we identify as our professions first.

For instance, when I was a securities lawyer in Washington, DC, whenever anyone met me and asked me about myself, I would automatically launch into a discussion of my legal career. Often, my response would start with, “I’m a lawyer”.

It wasn’t until the year I stopped practicing that I realized this costly misalignment in my thoughts. I remember the day so vividly. I was bemoaning to my sister how I was struggling with not practicing law, even though I had chosen to stop practicing and I felt it was right deep down in my gut. I remember declaring to my sister, “But if I’m not a lawyer, then who am I?”

This inquiry stopped my sister dead in her tracks. With a very shocked and sad expression she commented, “You are a human first and then a lawyer”.

What a wake-up call. That was the moment I really stopped and took inventory of who I really was and what I was about in this world. It took several years before I had real clarity.

I then realized that identifying so much with my career and/or profession had left me with a lack of my own identity as a human. Not a pretty or effective brand.

As such, it led to a sense of sadness and hollowness when I stripped myself of my title as a lawyer- an even worse brand.

What does this mean for you? Stop and consider:

  • How often do you identify with your career, profession and job to the detriment of who you are as a person? Why?
  • Does this identification help you be happy and balanced?
  • How does this identification impact your work product and your brand?
  • What would it be like for you to stop identifying with your career, profession and job?
  • What’s one action step you can take now to have more self-awareness around who you “are” and what you “do”?

If this material is helpful, please consider sharing it.  

I would love to hear your feedback.

WHY SO SERIOUS?

Back in the days when I was a practicing lawyer in Washington DC, I used to straighten my very curly hair. Every day. I used to get up early, forsake sleep or a work-out, and stand there and sweat it out. Pulling. Tugging my hair. Struggling. Resisting my natural curls.

Why?

I thought that in order to be seen as a competent lawyer, I had to be serious. I assumed curly hair meant I wasn’t serious. Straight hair equaled serious and competent.

One day I woke up and changed careers. What followed was a return to my natural curls. No more waking up early to straighten the curls. My morning options opened up: I could sleep, meditate longer, work out more often.

Does that mean I am not as competent or serious anymore? Not necessarily. I’m definitely competent and you better believe I’m serious about my work as a brand strategist.

I just stopped taking myself so seriously and decided to lighten up. That meant accepting who I was naturally- curly hair and all.   I stopped resisting my natural tendencies and started to “own” them.

You know what happened next? My curly hair became a part of my brand. Used wisely, I was able to balance curls as a complement to my branding strengths and talents. That meant in part that if my hair is curly, I made sure I offset the fun and free nature of the curls with a more smart visual brand (ie, no low cut tops, etc).

My curly hair is now part of my values and signals my creative and fun nature and expertise. No more resistance.

Yet, I regularly hear from so many of my clients that they want to seen as competent so they are working on being more “serious”. What does serious have to do with competence?

Being serious does not sell your brand.

Emotional resonance in brand development is what sells your brand. Emotional resonance is crucial. The only emotion that sells is happiness. So if you are telling me that your serious brand signals happiness somehow, then go for it.

Unfortunately, none of us really intend for our serious brand to be giving off a vibe of happiness. So our brand fails AND you are unhappy and confused, too.

Consider that our need for others to see us as competent is really our desire to be respected by others. It has nothing to do with being serious. Gaining others’ respect means we respect ourselves first. But do we respect ourselves enough first and foremost to own our own strengths (and curly hair)? No one can respect us otherwise- whether we are serious or not.

So what does this mean for you and your business, career, and your business brand, too? Stop and ask yourself:

  • Where in your life and career do you think you need to be more competent? Why?
  • Do you respect yourself to consider yourself competent?
  • How are you trying to achieve this competence by being more serious?
  • Where in your life and career could you show up more happy and sell more happy?
  • What would your own brand and your business/career brand look like if you were more happy and less serious?

Societal Brand Booster: The Impact of the Olympics

olympics2016I love the Olympics. Summer, Winter, all of it. It doesn’t matter to me the sport or the level of competition. Thinking back, I’ve always loved the Olympics. Not only was it inspirational to me as a little girl to see the athletes, it was fun to get into the spirit of the celebration of working on a dream and setting out to achieve it.

Nowadays in my family, we still get excited to watch the Olympics. And there’s more of a reason to love the games.

My husband and I have both developed a theory around the Olympics: The Olympics are good for our individual brands AND for business brands. How? Why?

Consider that 78% of everything you and I buy is NOT based on the content, but on how the service provider or product makes us feel. The only emotion that matters, sells, influences, attracts and engages is happiness.

The Olympics are high-toned and happy. For the two weeks or so that the Olympics are on, the world is a happier place. As a result, people are more motivated- motivated to help one another, to cheer one another on, to take care of themselves and be happier.

As a dentist, each Olympic season my husband notes a noticeable difference in his patients’ tone and willingness to take care of their teeth and oral health.

People are better brands. They (consciously or subconsciously) want to be better and be a part of something greater than just themselves. The Olympics fosters teamwork and support, which then leads to better business brands.

How could you not watch the athletes, hear the stories of the years of sacrifice and training they have made and not want more for yourself, your family, your business and your colleagues/career?

Contrast this with politics and the 2016 Vote. Blech…

The Olympics have been such a nice respite from the mud-slinging, fake-ness and low-toned campaigns we have to endure. That’s all we hear about. As a former lobbyist in Washington DC, I didn’t like it then. As a branding expert, I really don’t like it now. Nothing about politics is high-toned, including the candidates’ brands.

What does this mean for you?

• If you have a business/are an entrepreneur, take notice of how your business does during the Olympics. You should show a sign of increasing profits and sales. This would be the optimal time to take the momentum generated by the Olympics and boost your employees’ morale and drive – this will impact retention and production.

• If you work for an organization, notice how the staff and your colleagues are performing. This would be the optimal time to take the momentum generated by the Olympics and create a brand culture based on values and what drives your team as people.

• Stop and notice your own brand. Do you and your brand sell happiness at some level by showing up as happy? You should be happier and more motivated to allow success in your life. Take this extra brand boost and run with it for these two weeks. Hopefully, it will become a habit for you beyond the Olympics.

Questions? Comments? Suggestions? Call or email me to discuss how to harness your own brand and that of your teams’ brand to be optimal and happier and succeed more.

2016: How Are You Remembered?

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922757_60722554Before you think I’m asking you to make a new year’s resolution that you won’t keep, think again and choose to see things differently.  Yes, a new year is here.  With it can come the drudgery of the past or an opportunity for you to develop a brand for yourself that will leave you happier and more successful. Each of us has a choice.

I personally don’t get the concept of a new year’s resolution.  I believe I need to always be resolved to be better and think differently.  Otherwise, my brand stagnates and, in a way,  so does everything I touch.  Besides, resolutions sound kind of scary to me.  It feels like there’s no turning back — if I don’t keep my resolution or do it “good enough”, then I fail.

Deliberate brand creation is a marathon, not a new year’s sprint.  That’s what I always tell all our clients and also why 99% of our clients are in some sort of maintenance program with me once we have developed their initial brand. The process is never “over”, your brand is never “done”.  The good news is your brand just evolves and grows with time as you grow and change.  That’s exciting! That takes time, effort, deliberate thought and deliberate action and of course, a plan.

So let’s look at it differently and have you develop your brand from a new perspective.  Close your eyes and picture yourself on December 31, 2016.  An entire year has come and gone.

How is it that you are remembered  by the world on 12/31/16?  As Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “To know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived, this is to have succeeded”.  Barbara Stanny said in her fantastic book, Sacred Success, “All that matters is that your legacy reflects your purpose, makes you proud, brings you pleasure, and inspires or improves something or someone else”.

The memories others have of us are our brands.  Think in terms of memories. It’s then easier to relate to branding as a concept.

To get started, ask yourself:

  • What’s been my contribution in 2016? In answering this look at:
    • Did I have a particular cause and/or purpose greater than myself for which I stood?
    • How do people remember me emotionally?  As Carnegie once said,  we are all creatures of emotion, and not logic.  Emotions go farther than any of us want to believe. Positive emotions leave us with positive memories.
    • Did my contribution leave joy in the hearts of others ? Notice I did not mention leaving joy in the mind’s of others. The emotion of joy is captured in our hearts.
    • Did I choose to see people’s differences only, or was I compassionate towards others and towards MYSELF choosing to see our similarities?
  • How can my contribution continue to grow (and my brand develop) in the upcoming year?

Here’s to a 2016 filled with all the wonderful memories that leave you as the brand you want to be remembered by.

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First, Know Yourself So You Know What To Market.