All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘branding’

How Do You Want to Impact Colleagues, Staff and Others?

I went to my 6am spin class this morning.  I do my best to show up every Monday.  We have two fans in the spin room- one in front and one in back.  Many people love working out with the fan right on them to cool them down.  Many of us (me included) don’t like the cold wind/breeze on us. It dries out my eyes and I can’t catch my breath as I ride.

So many instructors have a rule: if you want the fan on you, then go sit in the back part of the room because the fan in the front of the room does not get turned on.  Those of us who don’t want the fan on us, sit up front.

Today there was a new person in class. He sat right next to me up front.  Ten minutes into class, he got up and turned on…the front fan! You got it, that’s a no-no.

However, this particular instructor does NOT have a “fan rule” for her class.  Every once in a while an argument flares up- like this morning- over whether the fan should be on or not.  If she just had a fan rule, then the students wouldn’t have to be making one up for her.  It’s not our job, or our right, to do so.

What does all this have to do with your impact at work and in your entire life?

Courageous brands win.  Having courage means being able to increase your level of “confront” and set rules and boundaries.  Having courage means looking me in the eye with kindness and a sheer sense of calm and peace and stating your opinion and needs and….fan rules.

In so many corporations when this level of courageous confront does NOT happen, what happens is chaos.

I’ve seen so many managers not be able to set boundaries or rules. Nor do they enforce them. It’s natural for us to all want to be loved and accepted. The problem is the result is often not love. When we don’t increase our confront, it leads to confusion and poor communication in the workplace.  The result is low productivity and low revenues. 

Believe it or not, people like rules.  We just don’t like it when the rules are shoved down our throat.  So courageous brands also communicate in a 1) kind and 1) direct manner.  Communicating without kindness, and just being direct, is being brash. No one loves a brash brand.

So stop and ask yourself:

  • How do you communicate at work? Is it kind and direct?
  • How do you work to ensure your level of confront is high enough so that you have quality boundaries such that you are allowing you and your colleagues to be productive, happy and in excellent communication at work?

Branding Q&A: Top Six Answers To Manifest Your Ideal Brand Success

What does it really take to have a successful career and happy life? How can we find an easier way to stand out, get attention and not stress so much? What if that’s just not your “thing”?

I regularly get questions like the ones above. I think they are all such insightful questions that deserve real answers- answers that are individualized to your particular nature and strengths.

Most recently, I was “interviewed” by a new graduate of my law school. She has just taken the bar exam and is so excited to succeed. As I was answering her questions, it occurred to me to write out my answers for my audience in general. As you’ll see below, the questions she asks are not just relevant just for a Millennial who has graduated law school. These questions are applicable to everyone, regardless of age, credentials or experience level.

Q: What do you think a person needs to become successful? 

A: I think the most important thing we all need to become successful is our own definition of what is success. Otherwise, we are chasing something we can’t even define, so how would we even know we achieved success. Most would simply define success as “more money” or “the most money I can accumulate”. However, stop and think for yourself, is this the real definition of success for you? If so, why?

Q: What is most important when creating a personal brand?

A: The most important element to keep in mind when creating a personal brand is self-awareness. We all must have self-awareness around our desires (see the question above), how we come across to others and how we want to authentically and deliberately put out our message to the world. Without this self-awareness then we have no baseline for improvement. Static brands lose.

Q: How long does it take for someone to create their own personal brand?

A: Nothing impactful and genuine happens overnight. Branding is a marathon, not a sprint. Branding is an iterative process, where we have self-awareness, try on something new, evaluate the impact by looking at it very honestly and sincerely and then we course correct. This requires time, patience, honesty and creativity.

Q: How can someone emotionally resonate with his or her audience (or future employer)?

A: First, you must understand that no one is buying our intellect or how good we are at our job. That may sound demoralizing, but it is not at all. 78% of everything you and I buy is based on how we feel about the purchase. If I like the product because it makes me happy, then I’ll buy it and even spread the gospel. This same logic applies to professionals. If I like you, I’ll choose to talk to you. If I talk to you and you share your brand story well with me, then I’m so much more likely to hire you, date you, be your friend, etc.

Q: How long did it take you to create your personal brand?

A: It took me years and years to master my brand. It was hard work and I resisted a lot along the way. I questioned myself and I worried for no reason. While branding is never “complete”, I feel I’m at a place where I truly own who I am and how I impact the world for good. The goal is that it will not take you nearly as long as it took me because I have developed the tools to get you to your brand mastery much faster and with much more ease and grace than I encountered.

Q: Can you build your personal brand individually or does it require feedback from others? 

A: You cannot build your brand alone. Part of my definition of personal brand is based on perception of your audience about your brand. You cannot ignore your audience, whoever they are. You must engage your audience to see how you are doing- -what needs to be tweaked and what is working well. Let your audience tell you what they need and want from you. If you ignore your audience, then you are effectively saying you live alone in this world.

BRAND CULTURE DEVELOPMENT Tip #1: Likeability

In brand development, it’s all about longevity. What about I talking about?

Well, in organizational work we do for clientele, companies are always looking to measure their Return on Investment (ROI). So if the brand lasts over time, then we can guarantee one measure of profitability that will prove out as stable over time.

Culture development in organizations is all about the people. The peoples’ individual brands are what sell any organizational brand. Organizations must live and commit to their “people”. Organizations can always do a better job of doing so.

Without this cultural assessment and growth, turnover is high, morale is often low and employees are in paralysis mode more often than not.

What’s the cure? In my world the cure is to have employees have a sense of self and an understanding of why they each do what they do and how they fit into the entire organizational framework. That may seem like a tall order. It’s not if you have the right process and expertise in place to make it happen. The process of individual brand development does take time.

There’s one central premise to this brand development process and that’s likeability. If I like you, I will engage with you and the rest is history. This is true whether you are in an organization or if you are an entrepreneur.

Likeability successfully grows from the notion of happiness. If 78% of everything we buy (including any service sector) is based on how we feel about it and NOT the content or the expertise, then we must look at the emotion or feeling that sells. This emotion is happiness.

To be likeable, you must first be happy at some level. I’m not asking for head over heals happy. Just a manageable level of feeling happy with yourself, your life and your career. No one will believe you’re happy if you are faking it. This brand development process takes time and patience. It’s definitely a marathon and NOT a sprint.

So now that you are happy and ready to show it, how do you generate likeability? The first step is that you have to offer your audience a way to connect with you. That means really connect with you in a way that is tangible and real so they can see the authentic and real “happy” you and be able to like you.

This level of connectivity is best when done in person obviously. So what’s the next best thing if you are not able to be in person in front of your audience all the time?

I’ve found the answer to be video.   If I can’t be in the room with you, then I need to be able to visually share my happiness with you so you can fall in like with me. Video is the next best thing.

Video allows for you to share your mannerisms, facial expression and overall happy vibe with your audience in an easy and natural manner.

The key is to just show up on video exactly as you would in person. Share your in-person brand with others over video instead of live. Don’t do anything or say anything over video that you wouldn’t do live. That means you don’t re-record or analyze your recording. You just emanate your happy brand and wait for people to connect and like you.

Entrepreneurial Brands: Honor & Responsibility

I mentor a young woman who is getting her undergraduate degree.  She recently interviewed me for her entrepreneur class. One of the questions she asked moved me very much.

Her question was, “What does it mean to you to think about yourself as an entrepreneur?”  I haven’t sat down and thought about this question in a very long time.  I sat back to reflect in order to give her an honest and sincere answer.   Instead what I discovered is that I became quiet emotional at the privilege I had to be an entrepreneur.

As I reflected on the last ten years of my life in running this company, two things stood out as themes to my answer:  honor and responsibility.

To be an entrepreneur for me means to be a pioneer and a trend-setter while helping people and organizations choose to see things differently and excel.  It is an honor and a privilege to be an entrepreneur and it is clearly NOT for everyone. Everyday is exciting and fun.  Others may see risk and instability, I see a promise to be better and impact the world in a positive way. I see it as my responsibility and an honor.

Every day it is my privilege to be allowed into our clients’ lives and hearts and minds.  Rarely is there a day when a client doesn’t drop their guard and become vulnerable with me in an effort to be better and do better.  What an honor and a privilege it is to be me and to have clients trust me in this way.

What does this mean for you?

Even if you are not entrepreneur, this line of thinking will serve you well in your work and career and personal life, too.  Stop and consider:

  • What is an activity in your life that is exciting and fun for you?
  • Can you take your current career and/or job and choose to see it from the vantage point of an entrepreneur- as fun, exciting and a true contribution to others?
  • If you answered “no” to the question above, can you take just ONE aspect of your current career and/or job and choose to see it that way?
  • In your life and career, have you stopped to listen to feedback from others regarding what you do that can be seen as: a) a privilege and b) a way to be of service to others?

I hope you found this material helpful.  If so, please SHARE it with others.  I’m always striving to provide you with content that is helpful to you and your brand and life.  Please email me with your feedback and questions: katy (at) purispersonalbranding.com.

Why So Sad? Sadness As A Brand.

I remember graduating from law school and taking the Indiana bar exam. While I was waiting for my bar results, I couldn’t imagine what I would do if I didn’t pass the exam.

What else could I do? I had gone to law school so I could practice law and “be” a lawyer. Just the thought of not being able to “be” a lawyer freaked me out and it made me sad. A general sense of depression came over me as I waited for the test results.

These days within the practice of law, or when we discuss any professional exceling at work and working “hard”, we naturally (and unfortunately) tend to discuss the high incidence of depression in the workforce.

This depression can come about for other reasons, too. I was recently discussing this very topic with a lawyer whose spouse is in the military. Every so many years they must move as her husband gets new orders. Each move guarantees a high likelihood that she, as a lawyer, won’t be able to practice in that new state because she hasn’t taken that particular state’s bar exam yet. She noted how this situation causes so many lawyers in her position to go into a deep depression. I had never stopped to consider this fact. Yet, I totally see how that situation can cause depression.

Why does this sadness and/or depression happen to professionals regarding their careers?

I think this happens because we are too tied to our identity as a particular professional and career. We don’t identify ourselves as people first, rather we identify as our professions first.

For instance, when I was a securities lawyer in Washington, DC, whenever anyone met me and asked me about myself, I would automatically launch into a discussion of my legal career. Often, my response would start with, “I’m a lawyer”.

It wasn’t until the year I stopped practicing that I realized this costly misalignment in my thoughts. I remember the day so vividly. I was bemoaning to my sister how I was struggling with not practicing law, even though I had chosen to stop practicing and I felt it was right deep down in my gut. I remember declaring to my sister, “But if I’m not a lawyer, then who am I?”

This inquiry stopped my sister dead in her tracks. With a very shocked and sad expression she commented, “You are a human first and then a lawyer”.

What a wake-up call. That was the moment I really stopped and took inventory of who I really was and what I was about in this world. It took several years before I had real clarity.

I then realized that identifying so much with my career and/or profession had left me with a lack of my own identity as a human. Not a pretty or effective brand.

As such, it led to a sense of sadness and hollowness when I stripped myself of my title as a lawyer- an even worse brand.

What does this mean for you? Stop and consider:

  • How often do you identify with your career, profession and job to the detriment of who you are as a person? Why?
  • Does this identification help you be happy and balanced?
  • How does this identification impact your work product and your brand?
  • What would it be like for you to stop identifying with your career, profession and job?
  • What’s one action step you can take now to have more self-awareness around who you “are” and what you “do”?

If this material is helpful, please consider sharing it.  

I would love to hear your feedback.

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First, Know Yourself So You Know What To Market.