Category Archive for: ‘sufficiency’

Part III- Stagnation In Your Friendships. Is Your Brand Dull and In Need of Change?

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www.oprah.com

www.oprah.com

In Part III of my four-part series on Brand Stagnation, let’s chat about stagnation of our personal brands within our friendships.  As a recap of “why” this series, I’ve been thinking a lot about brand stagnation lately.  It just so happened that so has Oprah!

Oprah has talked about this topic of Stagnation in her “What I know for sure” column of her September 2014 O Magazine, “The Two Questions You Should Ask Yourself Each Day”. Oprah, whether she knows it or not, is my mentor because I have incredible respect and appreciation for her presence in this world. For four weeks, I am taking her topic post and going deeper and looking at it from one of my viewpoints. This method is how I decide what is the next best area that ‘sparkles with rightness’ in the branding world.

So what is Stagnation of your brand within the context of your friendships?  Well, these days the word, “friendship” has an entirely different meaning to us all.  We have so many “friends” virtually that we seem to have lost the concept of real, dynamic, non-stagnate friendships.

I have lots of Facebook friends and many more people who want to be my Facebook friend whom I have not “accepted” as friends because I don’t know them- at all.  While I appreciate that these unknown wanna-be-friends are out there, I’d rather have a cup of coffee with each of them and then “accept” them as friends- on Facebook or in person.

I used to get all out of sorts over my Facebook friends.  I would think to myself that I should “accept” all these friends or the world would think I am not loved and don’t have enough friends.   Perhaps this would be a sign that I’m not running a good enough/successful enough business if I don’t have enough friends and “likes” on Facebook?  I would start to hyperventilate (sort of) and couldn’t focus on my work.  How dumb of me!  At some point, I stepped back and decided I had gotten sucked into the virtual friendship hole of mis-perceptions that feeds our low self-confidence levels.   I couldn’t let Facebook drive my confidence down!!

I think of it as this- I don’t need so many friends all over the place, just friends to whom I provide the same level of connection that I would want back for myself from a friend.  This means quality, not quantity for me.  And if someone chooses not to do business with me because of the number of my “likes”, “Facebook friends” or LinkedIn Connections, then so be it!  I can’t afford to be a half-way friend and risk my brand connection- more does not equal dynamic brand quality.  The more virtual friends, the more I found that my brand connection to them stagnated.

So how dynamic are you as a Facebook or real friend?  How far would you go to be a “good” friend (whatever you define as “good”)?  Does your personal brand shine as a friend or is it dull and stagnate? 

A good test of this concept is the following: next time your friend makes a request of you, stop and think to yourself how would I want my friend to respond if I was the one making such a request?” If you wouldn’t want it done to you, then think twice- your brand is not coming through and your friendship may have stagnated.

Another good test is to consider your friends circle- did you really “pick” them as friends or not?  Same test could apply to your friends who are family- would you be friends with your siblings if they weren’t your siblings?  Why or why not?  Be honest…that’s how you get to a dynamic brand with your friends.

 

Need A Little Respect?

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puris_faviconEver stop and wonder why it is that certain people garner more respect than others? Or at least that’s how it seems to look from the outside. What are they doing differently than others?

I was working with a client who was fed up.  He was so frustrated with why his brand was not consistent. Well, rather he was upset with why his personal brand was not consistently generating more business for him.  When I asked him what he wanted his personal brand to “say” about him, he went off on a tangent that ultimately led to his confession. He wanted MORE RESPECT from others.  Very honest of him, and interesting.

Well, who the heck wouldn’t want to be respected?  What respect signals is that we all want to ultimately be wanted and loved by others.   That’s fair and a good goal.  However,  we can’t force people to respect us and thus, love us.  It just doesn’t work that way.  It took my client a long time to “get” this notion.  I mean, we all “get” it, but to really “own” the concept is another thing.

As Lynne Twist says in one of my all-time favorite books, “The Soul of Money”, the concept of sufficiency means that we believe that there is enough for everyone to have “some” and that no one has to go without.  There is plenty of abundance available for us all.  We just need to focus on what we have instead of what we don’t have.  In this way, what we have (and thus want more of) grows.

So what does this have to do with you getting more respect?  Well, you can’t force others to respect you.  You can’t force them to love you.  You can’t get respect by feeling inadequate and entitled to it.  That’s a nasty personal brand. It doesn’t work in business or in personal lives.

The only way to get respect is to first GIVE and expect nothing back in return.  I know that notion may be cliche’ sadly. However, it is the only way your personal brand (and business/career) thrives.

So stop and think about the last time you did something for someone just because it was the kind thing to do.  Where you expected absolutely nothing in return, but got a ton back in return.  The positive stuff you get back (business, clients, referrals, money, love) doesn’t even have to show up from the original recipient of your good deeds.  It just shows up because you had a strong personal brand and you gave.  You just have to accept it and be grateful.

Now go out there and generate a fantastic personal brand by just giving.

 

 

Collaborative Personal Brand Building

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I see lots of personal brands fail for a very simple reason: people tend to be competitive instead of collaborative. Period. End of story.  While this may seem silly on its face, it is a sure way to ruin your personal brand value and perception.  Not to mention, it is a very easy way to lead an unhappy life and not resonate with anyone.  After all, stop and think about how many people you know who are “successful”, yet lonely.  I often think about what is must be like to reach the “top” and be alone.  It can’t feel good.

In her fantastic book, The Soul of Money, global activist and fundraiser, Lynne Twist, devotes much time to this very topic of collaboration versus competition.  While the focus is on our relationship with money, Twist really drives the point home that those who collaborate more than compete have more quality lives, and thus stronger and more quality personal brands.

Twist points out that the “…idea of scarcity and competition are just the way it is, is no longer even viable science.”  Twist sites evolutionary biologist, Elisabet Sahtouris who notes that, “Nature fosters collaboration and reciprocity.  Competition in Nature exists, but is has limits, and the true law of survival is ultimately cooperation.”  Twist goes on to write that while the Earth does involve competition, it is in bounds and is not about annihilation, but instead about taking what we need and leaving enough for your competition to live, too.

As I often try to get my clients to see, there is NO competition if we all really “get” how unique we are.  Once we see this side of ourselves, then collaboration becomes the norm- and that’s a fantastic personal brand.  As Twist references, “…You’re not in a war; you’re in a community”.  Take this from me, a person who comes from a war-torn country of origin.  We’d all be better off if we remembered this point- always.

So next time you are presented with a quandary, or a decision to make, consider:

-what is driving your decision? 

– are you coming from a place of collaboration, sufficiency and true cooperation? OR

– are you coming from a competitive place, where jealousy reigns and your personal brand value and self-confidence is low?

 

 

 

First, Know Yourself So You Know What To Market.