Category Archive for: ‘natural talent’

What’s Your Super-Hero Power?

Growing up, I loved Wonder Woman! I thought she was so pretty and strong and she seemed really kind, too.  Fast forward, and at 45 years of age, I still love Wonder Woman.  I still think she’s pretty, strong and kind.  For me, it’s not a feminist “thing”. It was just the fact that I related to her based on gender and still do.  Or maybe that does make it a feminist thing?!?

These days we call it “strength”/natural talent instead of “super-here power”. I prefer the term, “super-hero power” because it is a lot more fun and allows us to get creative and use our imagination.

Everyone of us has our own super-hero power within us.  We just choose to not look inside to find it because it seems silly, perhaps.  However, the only way to stay relevant in this world is to figure out your power and use it to be of service in this world.  Otherwise, I can totally see how we can feel irrelevant and let it get us down.

So close your eyes and think to the one thing you do everyday that comes so naturally for you- it’s like breathing air or blinking.  What do others compliment you on most often?  Maybe that will help you come up with your power.  Another way to come up with your power is to consider what in this world amazes and fascinates you the most to the point you think about it often.  Bugs? Why it snows? Cooking?  Exercise? You get the picture.

Regardless of how you come up with your power, it’s there.  Most of my clients just can’t see this fact when we first start collaborating together.

Acknowledging our power then leads us to acknowledge that we can use this power to support others, be of service, serve our purpose and perhaps…if we really are brave….save the world- just like our favorite super-hero did. 

If this thought is really far-fetched to you, then consider you may be playing small and not choosing to see your own greatness.  Relax into it and give it a shot- you may surprise yourself by how much fun you are having and finding your purpose here.  Plus, I bet you’d look really great dressed up as your very own super-hero for Halloween. I did!

Is That the Right Job?

I remember when I was a practicing securities lawyer.   For the most part, I often felt like I was in the right job. I didn’t hate my work nor the people I worked with. I got paid well for what I did.  Plus, my work was fairly routine and not terribly stressful.

So did that mean it was the right job for me?  Not necessarily given what I do now for a living is really the right business for me.

In organizations, leadership often looks at whether an employee is in the “right” or “wrong” position.  This isn’t always a full assessment of how to build a strong, profitable organization. The better inquiry is to ask whether an employee’s strengths are aligned with who they are in a particular position.

In my world of brand development and culture building in organizations, it is all about the people. The people drive revenues. If the employees are not engaged, then everything takes a hit.  Sometimes management denies this fact and looks the other way.  Sooner or later, if employees are not happy it impacts the organization.

In my opinion, the first thing that has to happen is that employees figure out who they really are- at work and at home.  This leads to a natural understanding of their strengths.  Once these strengths are deciphered, then we can look to see if the employee is in the right position. 

Instead what often happens is that organizations choose to focus on an employee’s weakness.  I say that’s a waste of time.  Why would I focus on your employee’s weakness instead of capitalizing on their strengths? After all, their strength makes them happier at work.  Happier employees are more engaged and lead to higher morale and productivity for any organization.

Oftentimes we find there is no “right” or “wrong” position for an employee, just a lack of understanding and cultivation of an employee’s true strengths and talents that would make them a great fit for their job.  These strengths are not necessarily tied to their linear, analytical mind.  These strengths are closely aligned with their personal story and upbringing and whether they are bringing their bad baggage to work with them everyday or not.

What does this mean for you?  Whether you’re looking for yourself or your employees,, stop and consider:

  • What are the strengths of an individual?  What are your strengths?
  • How can you capitalize on these strengths to impact engagement and cultivate a true culture that grows with ease and grace in any setting?

Entrepreneurial Brands: Honor & Responsibility

I mentor a young woman who is getting her undergraduate degree.  She recently interviewed me for her entrepreneur class. One of the questions she asked moved me very much.

Her question was, “What does it mean to you to think about yourself as an entrepreneur?”  I haven’t sat down and thought about this question in a very long time.  I sat back to reflect in order to give her an honest and sincere answer.   Instead what I discovered is that I became quiet emotional at the privilege I had to be an entrepreneur.

As I reflected on the last ten years of my life in running this company, two things stood out as themes to my answer:  honor and responsibility.

To be an entrepreneur for me means to be a pioneer and a trend-setter while helping people and organizations choose to see things differently and excel.  It is an honor and a privilege to be an entrepreneur and it is clearly NOT for everyone. Everyday is exciting and fun.  Others may see risk and instability, I see a promise to be better and impact the world in a positive way. I see it as my responsibility and an honor.

Every day it is my privilege to be allowed into our clients’ lives and hearts and minds.  Rarely is there a day when a client doesn’t drop their guard and become vulnerable with me in an effort to be better and do better.  What an honor and a privilege it is to be me and to have clients trust me in this way.

What does this mean for you?

Even if you are not entrepreneur, this line of thinking will serve you well in your work and career and personal life, too.  Stop and consider:

  • What is an activity in your life that is exciting and fun for you?
  • Can you take your current career and/or job and choose to see it from the vantage point of an entrepreneur- as fun, exciting and a true contribution to others?
  • If you answered “no” to the question above, can you take just ONE aspect of your current career and/or job and choose to see it that way?
  • In your life and career, have you stopped to listen to feedback from others regarding what you do that can be seen as: a) a privilege and b) a way to be of service to others?

I hope you found this material helpful.  If so, please SHARE it with others.  I’m always striving to provide you with content that is helpful to you and your brand and life.  Please email me with your feedback and questions: katy (at) purispersonalbranding.com.

Relatability Part II: Great Brands Are Basic

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Over the years I’ve learned one thing for sure.  I’ve learned that because we are human, we tend to complicate everything…constantly. In particular, in my world of brand development I watch clients struggle with their brand and how to relate to their clients and prospects.

I’m guilty of the same thing, so I really get it.  For years, I struggled with how to tie in the fact that I was a former, successful securities lawyer with being a people branding/marketing expert.  What the heck did one have to do with the other and why would anyone believe me?  What if people thought I was a fraud? Worse yet, was I a fraud?  It wasn’t until I really came into my own “being” a branding expert that I got that the two careers/concepts can co-exist very well.  I realized that being a securities lawyer was a very natural basis for being a branding and marketing expert.  Guess what- others believed it, too.

Just the other day, I had a client who used to be a super-star college football player.  His career was on such a course for success that the media talked about not “if”, but “when” he was going to get drafted and by whom.  Fast forward 15 years later and he is not playing football.  He is in professional services. His big struggle: there is no relating my past as a football player with my work in professional services.  He was frustrated.

So I just asked him to start telling me about what a typical football game was like for him and what his methodology, or state of mind, was on the field.  As he started to talk, a curious thing happened: his eyes lit up, he became animated, he sat up taller and had real clarity and conviction- and dare I say….confidence!  The next thing that happened was even more fabulous- he naturally took my nonverbal cue and started to tie in his mentality for success on the football field with what he does for his clients right now.

It made perfect sense to me. His explanation and analogy was relevant, easy to follow and left him very relatable for me.  I got it, I got him, I got his brand, and by extrapolation I could see that his expertise on the football field made him an expert in his current occupation.  I liked him and related to him!

So what does this mean for you?  Always go back to what you know best and make it relatable to your current situation/career/audience.  Don’t get hung up and make things complex- keep it simple.  Just because football and professional services are not often viewed together does NOT mean that you are not relatable in tying in your expertise in both areas.

For example, do you love to cook? Maybe you are even really an expert at cooking, even if your “day job”/career is being a lawyer.   Start tying in your ability to cook with your ability to be a great lawyer. Just start talking about the latest dish you made and why. You’ll start to see that your mentality in approaching a situation (i.e., your brand value) is what’s valuable to both being a cook and a lawyer.

Anytime you go back to the basics of your expertise and love of anything, you can become easily relatable to clients and prospects in your current field.  

Learning Agility: How Flexible & Creative Is Your Brand?

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Ever wonder how some people just have greater and better capacity for life than others? I’m not talking just in business, but in what seems all aspects of their life.  Ever wonder why the entrepreuner can really wear all the hats of CEO and Chief Bathroom Cleaner, too?

In my time, I’ve learned that being flexible and open to new ideas is one of the most important attributes  in my life.  The only attribute higher for me personally is integrity.

Being an immigrant has always helped me be flexible, nimble and see the world of options before me. That’s just how we grew up.  We moved to the US with two suitcases thinking we were just here on vacation. We never ended up leaving, which was fantastic. When I stop and think about how much my parents had to tolerate change and be flexible and creative, I’m astounded.

I lost some of my willingness to try new things and flexibility to adapt when I was knee deep into the practice of law. I’m not quiet sure what it was.  Maybe it was because my days were very predictable and the law was founded in precedence.  I really didn’t think anyone cared for me to be creative, flexible and take on new learnings beyond my substantive practice.  Being a lawyer was hard enough, it seemed.

But somewhere deep inside me, I was yearning to learn new things, adapt and try on new roles and experiences in life that may have made me uncomfortable, but would have been fun and creative.  I was used to discomfort and sitting in the unknown. In a way, I thrive on novelty and unchartered territory, but I also have compassion for how others may not share my views.

Fast forward all these years to now, where I run this personal branding company.  What I ask of my clients all day long is for them to sit in discomfort, put on a creative hat and try to learn from new experiences and apply their lessons learned to new situations.  In particular, I want them to apply their lessons to new situations that may not always be predictable and comfortable.

This is the hallmark of a dynamic and creative personal brand.  People will always stand up and notice you and your brand if you are agile, fluid and creative.  People welcome your self-confidence to try on something new.

In the workplace this notion is referred to as “learning agility”.   In fact, The Korn Ferry Institute says learning agility is a leading predictor of talent and leadership success for people.  Korn Ferry also finds that learning agility is rare, with only 15% of the workforce being highly learning agile.

John Delaney, Dean of the school of business at University of Pittsburgh, said it best in a Huffington Post article about this very subject.  Professor Delaney said, “Learning agility is what happens when a lawyer is asked to maintain a robust social media presence or a financial professional is tapped to open a global office even with limited knowledge of the new country’s economy or culture, and yet they overcome their lack of experience and discomfort and find a way to simply make it work.  Those who are learning agile know what to do when they don’t know what to do. They know the questions to ask, the people to work with to find the answers they need and they are comfortable being uncomfortable.”

 So what does this mean for you? Stop and ask yourself:

– How willing and self-confident are you to take that next step at work even when you not sure what to do? How about in your personal life?

– How often do you find yourself in uncomfortable situations where you are willing to tough it out in order to find a solution?

– How creative do you allow yourself and your brand be in order to grow as a human and a leader?

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First, Know Yourself So You Know What To Market.