Is Your Message Consistent?

Have you ever tried to have a conversation with someone and they seem to send very different messages within the same communication? I know I go nuts just trying to follow the conversation.  Heck, sometimes I’m actually the one with the messy communication, where my message and my brand are garbled.

Just the other day, a client asked how their law firm could tell if their message was consistent enough. Good question.

There are 2 ways to tell:

1) Are people listening to you and engaging with you? Are they even noticing you? If so, you can take that as a good sign that your message is consistent. If your message wasn’t consistent then you would be confusing your audience so they wouldn’t even stop and notice you, much less listen to your message.

2) What do your formal and informal survey and feedback suggest? Your organization must survey and get feedback from people asking them if they:

a) understand your message; and,

b) find it compelling enough to:

i) stop and listen; and,

ii) take action and connect with you and your company.

In essence, you are asking your audience if they trust you. If your message is consistent, then your audience will feel safe with you (they hear and see the same thing each and every time so they know what to expect) and thus, trust you.

Once your audience trusts you, then you’re almost home free.   Trust grows over time, so you must make sure you are authentic in your resonance with your audience. So every bit of what we just discussed here rides on each and every person within your organization, band, and/or business having a solid and authentic personal brand.

About the Author

purisbranding

Katy Goshtasbi has thirteen years experience as an attorney working in all areas of corporate America. She combines her knowledge of what succeeds in corporate America with her inherent understanding of what is a successful personal brand and presence. This in turn translates into clients being in control of their first impressions.

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First, Know Yourself So You Know What To Market.